Shannon Pratt-Phillips, Ph.D

Articles by Shannon Pratt-Phillips, Ph.D - 46 results

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Nutrition

Formulating a Feed Program for: A Horse Coming Into Work

Horses coming into work for the season, or for the first time, will start with light exercise and eventually get into moderate, heavy or intense work.

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Nutrition

Formulating a Feed Program for: An Underweight Horse

This article will address the protocol for refeeding a starved horse, as well as feeding a horse that is merely thin, in order to help it put on weight.

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Nutrition

Top 10 Horse Nutrition FAQs

Equine nutritionist, Dr. Shannon Pratt-Phillips, answers some of the most common questions owners have about feeding their horses and their nutrition.

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Nutrition

Cereal Grains vs Commercial Mixes

Owners and managers tend to turn to higher energy density feeds, such as whole cereal grains or commercial mixes when pasture or hay does not suffice.

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Nutrition

Legume Hay vs Grass Hay

The choice between grass hay and legume hay depends on your horse and his needs. This article highlights the benefits of both and which one you should pick.

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Nutrition

Formulating a Feed Program for: A Senior or Retired Horse

Older horses are typically considered “senior” or “geriatric,” and may have age-related changes that warrant some feeding modifications.

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Nutrition

Why Does My Horse Lick?

Why is your horse licking the hitching post, and your hands, and jacket? Is she missing something in her diet, or is she just an odd-ball?

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Nutrition

Feeding to Prevent Winter Colic

Colic is a painful digestive disturbance for horses, where excessive gasses may build up, blockages may occur, or worse. Learn more in this article.

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Nutrition

Do I Need to Feed my Horse More in the Winter?

When horses digest forage it generates heat. Find out how much you need to feed to keep your horse warm during the cold winter months.

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Nutrition

Should I Feed Bran Mash as a Winter Treat?

A warm bran mash can give the horse some momentary warmth and some additional fibre and may also be a way to sneak in some additional salt.