Articles - training

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Improve Your Sitting Trot

A bouncy, unstable sitting trot is not only uncomfortable, it’s also hard on both your and your horse’s joints, spine and back muscles.

By: Anne Gage
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Unlocking Inversion

If your horse tends to have a hollowed back, it can indicate weakness through the abdominals and lack of engagement. Here are some targeted exercises.

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Introducing the Double Bridle

How to recognize when your horse is ready for the double bridle, a dressage milestone, plus how to choose the right bridle and bitting options.

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Meaningful Round Pen Work

Josh Nichol shows us that the type of horse you are training will determine how to use the round pen in a meaningful way that will help them trust and learn

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Introducing the Flying Change

The flying change is one of those movements that defines the beginning of upper-level dressage training. Introduce it by keeping it simple.

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How do I keep my Heels Down?

Trainer Lindsay Grice explains why it’s important for horseback riders to keep their heels down in the stirrups, and how to maintain the position.

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Teach Your Horse to Lower His Head for the Bridle

If your horse won't stay still to be bridled, and physical pain has been ruled out, try positive reinforcement to teach him to lower his head and be still.

By: Anne Gage
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5 Qualities of the Coachable Athlete

Psychologist April Clay lists the top five qualities of a great equestrian student, with the attitude, self-control and work ethic to succeed.

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Modern Day Training for Competition

The science behind competition coaching, and how modern teaching methods can better simulate the pressures and choices riders have to make in the ring.

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The Positive Use of Pressure

Trainer Josh Nichol says that using well-timed pressure in a non-threatening way can be a useful training tool to help your horse learn.